Hello all interested sorts! I am Holly, an engineer with far more opinions and ideas than I can safely store in my head. I welcome you to my little corner of insanity--it's more fun here. :-)

 

"My name is Zuko. Son of Ursa and Firelord Ozai. Prince of the Fire Nation and heir to the throne!"

(Source: reisuka)

jtotheizzoe:

Coming to YouTube on August 19th! 
Frankenstein M.D. is a modern re-telling of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (did you know it was the first sci-fi book?), from Pemberley Digital, the same people who brought you The Lizzie Bennett Diaries and Emma Approved, and PBS Digital Studios. The story centers around Victoria Frankenstein (rather than “Victor” from the book), an eccentric and driven MD/PhD student who wants to prove herself in the traditionally male-dominated field of medical research. Basically, this is what we would get if Mary Shelley created a YouTube science show :)
I’m also happy to announce that I’m lending my PhD chops and serving as science consultant for the series, which is SO FUN!!! I’m working hard to make sure the science you’ll see in the series is the real thing. At least in theory. I mean, we can’t really bring frightening creatures back from the dead. Yet.
Check out the full details on the series, the cast, and the premiere here. And, just like the worlds of Lizzie Bennet and Emma Woodhouse, the Frankenstein universe will be bigger than just the videos. Here’s a few links so you can start following the characters:
Victoria on Twitter, Victoria on Tumblr
Iggy DeLacey on Twitter, Iggy on Tumblr


YAY

jtotheizzoe:

Coming to YouTube on August 19th! 

Frankenstein M.D. is a modern re-telling of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (did you know it was the first sci-fi book?), from Pemberley Digital, the same people who brought you The Lizzie Bennett Diaries and Emma Approved, and PBS Digital Studios. The story centers around Victoria Frankenstein (rather than “Victor” from the book), an eccentric and driven MD/PhD student who wants to prove herself in the traditionally male-dominated field of medical research. Basically, this is what we would get if Mary Shelley created a YouTube science show :)

I’m also happy to announce that I’m lending my PhD chops and serving as science consultant for the series, which is SO FUN!!! I’m working hard to make sure the science you’ll see in the series is the real thing. At least in theory. I mean, we can’t really bring frightening creatures back from the dead. Yet.

Check out the full details on the series, the cast, and the premiere here. And, just like the worlds of Lizzie Bennet and Emma Woodhouse, the Frankenstein universe will be bigger than just the videos. Here’s a few links so you can start following the characters:

YAY

NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")

SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.

WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")

MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?

DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.

WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.

EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.

WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.

EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.

WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.

(SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)

ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?

AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")

DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.

WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")

SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.

WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...

ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.

WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?

ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.

EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?

WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.

EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.

WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.

Anonymous asked
What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

pleasingdaddy:

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

This ^^^ just ALL OF THIS ^^^

A little darker than stuff I normally mention, but I have lots of angry feelings about this. BDSM =/= Abuse, but this travesty of a tale does.

Coolest Comic-Con Cosplay: The First 24 Hours

(Source: cerulean-spork)